Categories
Women & Creativity

In Her Shoes: 30 Day Art Challenge

As part of BENOW, Fal Culture’s annual festival celebrating the culture of women, we are launching a 30 day art challenge called #InHerShoes. The challenge will be posted on the Falmouth Art Gallery Instagram using the hashtag #InHerShoes https://www.instagram.com/falmouthartgallery/ 

In the spirit of BENOW, the challenge will begin on the 8th March – International Women’s Day- and will last for 30 days. All are welcome to participate, artists and novices alike! If you would like to take-part, please see further details below.

Explore views of our world from Falmouth to afar by stepping into the shoes of the female artists who have depicted it. We invite you to get creative and join our 30 day art challenge #InHerShoes. Each day we will post a different artwork on our Instagram, all by female artists and sourced from the Falmouth Art Gallery Collection. We challenge you to respond creatively through any medium of your choice, it could be art/photography/poetry/words, and to share your creations on Instagram using the hashtag #InHerShoes or email to intern2@falmouthartgallery.com. We will be reposting some of your entries as we go, and sharing additional stories of the 30 artists from our collection along the way so keep an eye out for our daily posts. All of the entries will be displayed in a digital exhibition on open.falculture.org and in our Community Gallery when we re-open. We look forward to seeing what you create! For links to our social media, and the BENOW festival programme of events, please see below:

Explore views of our world from Falmouth to afar by stepping into the shoes of the female artists who have depicted it. We invite you to get creative and join our 30 day art challenge #InHerShoes. Each day we will post a different artwork on our Instagram, all by female artists and sourced from the Falmouth Art Gallery Collection.

We challenge you to respond creatively through any medium of your choice, it could be art/photography/poetry/words, and to share your creations on Instagram using the hashtag #InHerShoes or email to intern2@falmouthartgallery.com.

We will be reposting some of your entries as we go, and sharing additional stories of the 30 artists from our collection along the way so keep an eye out for our daily posts.

All of the entries will be displayed in a digital exhibition on open.falculture.org and in our Community Gallery when we re-open. We look forward to seeing what you create! For links to our social media, please see below:

Categories
Women & Creativity

The Male Dominated Realm of Literature and Art

The journey of women through art has been one of muse to artist, and nowhere is it more prominent than in literature.

For the longest time, literature and art has only been viewed through the patriarchal master narrative, benefiting only male artists, and erasing female ones. For instance, while the earliest known fiction is often credited to Miguel de Cervantes’ ‘Don Quixote’, the title actually goes to Enheduanna, a Sumerian priestess in the 24th century B.C. Though this is an extreme example of women being erased from the narrative, we see the effects of male-led creativity even in the 18th and 19th centuries, with prominent female writers such as Mary Shelley and the Bronte sisters either writing under pseudonyms or publishing only with their husbands’ revisions. Thus was born the need for ‘l’ecriture feminine’.

Coined by Helene Cixous in her 1975 essay ‘The laugh of the Medusa’, ‘l’écriture feminine’ describes a fluid, subversive method of writing, characterised by its tendency to break free of the more traditional rules and regulations attributed to the master narrative. This allows female writers more freedom to explore their own narrative, their own story, without feeling tied down by the guidelines of conservative male writing.

An example of this is Stream of Consciousness writing, pioneered by Virginia Woolf, a strong advocate for the necessity and beauty of female creativity. The same gender bias falls across all aspects of creativity, with a Swedish woman named Hilma af Klint being the very first abstract artist in the late 1800s, though Kandinsky is often given that title. The patriarchal master narrative is pervasive in every aspect of art and creativity, and yet it’s always women at the front lines of change and evolution, creating newer, more interesting things that they’re never even remembered for.

We can see a shift in paradigm, although very slow, in which society begins to acknowledge and celebrate women’s roles in creativity with a new-found appreciation.

Categories
Women & Creativity

Creativity: Introduction

Women have always provided an immense contribution to the creative world, whether in art, literature, music, or in design and more business-related realms.

Throughout history, prominent female artists and creatives have drawn from their own lives and situations, using their isolation, persecution, and oppression to create something entirely new, often forging brand new fields and practices.

While these new discoveries have often been accredited to men, recent changes such as the second wave of feminism have shed light, now more than ever, on the prevalence and significance of creative women in society.